Monday, January 25, 2016

TWO WINNERS!

It gives me great pleasure to announce the winners of my two recent giveaways.



According to randomizer.org, the winner of the hardcover copy of THE GOBLIN'S PUZZLE by Andrew S. Chilton is:





Congratulations, Akoss!  Expect an email from me asking for your mailing address.


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And now, according to randomizer, the winner of the hardcover copy of NOOKS & CRANNIES by Jessica Lawson is:




Congratulations, Rosi! Expect an email from me asking for your mailing address.



And thanks to everyone for supporting my blog. 


Monday, January 18, 2016

NOOKS & CRANNIES Giveaway, and an Exclusive Interview with Jessica Lawson!



Nooks & Crannies by Jessica Lawson, illustrated by Natalie Andrewson (June 2015, Simon and Schuster, 336 pages, for ages 8 to 12)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory "meets "Clue "when six children navigate a mansion full of secrets--and maybe money--in this humorous mystery with heart. Sweet, shy Tabitha Crum, the neglected only child of two parents straight out of a Roald Dahl book, doesn't have a friend in the world--except for her pet mouse, Pemberley, whom she loves dearly. But on the day she receives one of six invitations to the country estate of wealthy Countess Camilla DeMoss, her life changes forever.

Upon the children's arrival at the sprawling, possibly haunted mansion, it turns out the countess has a very big secret--one that will change their lives forever.

Then the children beginning disappearing, one by one. So Tabitha takes a cue from her favorite detective novels and, with Pemberley by her side, attempts to solve the case and rescue the other children...who just might be her first real friends.

Why I recommend it: Nooks & Crannies is clever and charming, with a spunky, inquisitive heroine and one of the most adorable pet sidekicks ever. Ten-year-old me would have hugged this book and carried it around for days. This is the perfect book for a cold snowy winter day, curled up in your favorite chair with a cup of tea and a few English biscuits.

And now, I'm thrilled to welcome author Jessica Lawson back to my blog (see her earlier visit here) for an exclusive interview!

Jessica Lawson, from her website

1) You must have read quite a few mysteries before writing this book. What were your favorite mystery novels when you were growing up?

Growing up (age 8 or so), my go-to mysteries were the Cam Jansen books. As I got older, I graduated to my aunt’s baskets of paperback mysteries—Agatha Christie and Mary Higgins Clark and P.D. James. I was 10-12 years old when I first started reading them, and remember being fascinated by those books. And, while this isn’t book-related, I think that a big love for the more cozy-style mysteries began as a bonding experience with my mom. Starting around age 8 or 9, she would let me watch Murder She Wrote with her (with the fabulous Angela Lansbury as Jessica Fletcher) and we’d make 25 cent bets on “whodunit” after the first commercial break.

2) That's a fun childhood memory! Can you describe your writing routine? And is your writing area, by any chance, a nook? Details, please.

With little ones around (one who still wakes up at night on occasion), my writing routine is very flexible by necessity. To make writing time happen, I’ve tried various strategies like getting up super early or having ready activities for the kids so that I can get an hour here, a half hour there. I can’t seem to stay up late to write—my brain works best in the morning hours and my creative energy is mostly sapped by the afternoon. So while I can edit at night if I’m on a deadline, I write and revise best in the earlier hours of the day.

During warmer weather, my husband will take the kids outside or on a field trip for a few hours on the weekends, which is a big help. I know that some people say that you need to write a certain amount every single day, but it just doesn’t work out that way for me in this stage of my life. I think about writing and my current projects every day, and will have small plot epiphanies or sparks of dialogue come to me (in which case I’ll jot those down on a post-it for the next time I write). But some days, writing gets shoved off my schedule, and that’s okay.

Jessica's writing space: the kitchen table

Photos courtesy of Jessica Lawson












As for my writing space, sadly, it’s not a nook. How I long for a nook! Alas, instead, I park my laptop on the kitchen table and pile an extra chair with my notes. When company comes over, my “office” is moved to my bedroom floor. Not very glamorous, but between the kitchen table and the living/family room couch, I’ve managed to get a lot of writing done.



3) Well, that space seems to be working just fine for you!  Jess, I'm not ready to let Tabitha go. Will there be any further adventures for our plucky heroine?

Thank you for asking~ I would love to revisit Tabitha’s story and see what comes next! That said, there are no near-future plans for another Tabitha book—the books of mine that will come out in 2016 and 2017 aren’t set in that world. But I will be keeping her in my back pocket for future project ideas. I’ve also dabbled with the idea of writing a middle grade starring a 12-year-old Percival Pensive and his sidekick, Timothy Tibbs (the Holmes/Watson-esque fiction-within-fiction characters from mystery books that Tabitha Crum loves)~ if you read NOOKS & CRANNIES, you’ll see that Pensive novel quotes begin each chapter and those two seem like they’d be loads of fun to write about.


4) That would be fun! If you could live in a mansion with hidden passageways, what would you use them for?

Oh, good question! I would use them for quick access to my massive library/kitchenette (I have my own mansion, right? It MUST have a massive library/kitchenette, right?) and for epic games of hide-and-seek and laser tag with my kids (note: I have never actually played laser tag, but it looks fun).


Thanks, Jessica! I enjoyed having you back on My Brain on Books. 

Jessica's website


And now, for the Giveaway details:

Readers, I'm so in love with this book I want everyone to read it. I'm giving away an extra copy to one lucky winner. To enter, simply be a follower of this blog and comment on this post. Mention the giveaway on social media, and I'll give you more chances to win. Open to US mailing addresses only. This giveaway ends at 10pm on Sunday January 24 and the winner will be announced on Monday January 25. So you only have one week! Good luck!

(And don't forget my giveaway for THE GOBLIN'S PUZZLE, still going on here!)

Monday, January 11, 2016

ECHO by Pam Munoz Ryan -- and Newbery thoughts, anyone?

The Newbery awards (and other ALA Youth Media Awards) will be announced this morning in Boston at 8 am EST. I'm posting this at 7 am, so at this point, all I can do is wish and hope. I've read so many wonderful MG novels this year that it's difficult to pick just one I think should win.

I have so many favorites: Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly, Blue Birds by Caroline Starr Rose, Full Cicada Moon by Marilyn Hilton, The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin, Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead, along with others I haven't had a chance to blog about yet. Don't you wish all the books you read and loved this past year could win awards?

One that's certainly deserving of multiple awards is a book published in February 2015, and which I finally read on my recent blogging break in December.



Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan (February 24, 2015, Scholastic Press, 592 pages, for ages 10 to 14)

Source: my favorite local indie bookstore, Children's Book World!

Synopsis (from Indiebound):  Music, magic, and a real-life miracle meld in this genre-defying masterpiece from storytelling maestro Pam Munoz Ryan. Lost and alone in a forbidden forest, Otto meets three mysterious sisters and suddenly finds himself entwined in a puzzling quest involving a prophecy, a promise, and a harmonica.

Decades later, Friedrich in Germany, Mike in Pennsylvania, and Ivy in California each, in turn, become interwoven when the very same harmonica lands in their lives. All the children face daunting challenges: rescuing a father, protecting a brother, holding a family together. And ultimately, pulled by the invisible thread of destiny, their suspenseful solo stories converge in an orchestral crescendo.

Why I recommend it: Echo is 592 pages long, yet it was so fascinating and so beautifully written I read it in one day! I absolutely loved how the three seemingly-disparate storylines all came together at the end. And because the three stories all hinge on a harmonica, and my late father played the harmonica, this novel affected me in a big way. This is the kind of book that sends shivers up your spine. If Echo doesn't win at least a Newbery honor today, I'll be sorely disappointed.

As the awards are announced, what books were you hoping would win Newbery honors or the Newbery medal?


Monday, January 4, 2016

THE GOBLIN'S PUZZLE and a giveaway!


I'm back from my blogging break, and for those who remember my TBR pile of eight books, well, let's just say I've read all but one of them, and I'm reading that right now! I also spent a lot of time with family (including my father-in-law who was in the hospital, but he's better now. Thanks for asking!). In the meantime, I missed reading your blogs and I look forward to catching up.





The Goblin's Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton, with illustrations by Jensine Eckwall (January 19, 2016, Knopf Books for Young Readers, 288 pages, for ages 8 to 12)


Synopsis (from the publisher):

THE BOY is a nameless slave on a mission to uncover his true destiny.
THE GOBLIN holds all the answers, but he’s too tricky to be trusted.
PLAIN ALICE is a bookish peasant girl carried off by a confused dragon.
And PRINCESS ALICE is the lucky girl who wasn’t kidnapped.

All four are tangled up in a sinister plot to take over the kingdom, and together they must face kind monsters, a cruel magician, and dozens of deathly boring palace bureaucrats. They’re a ragtag bunch, but with strength, courage, and plenty of deductive reasoning, they just might outwit the villains and crack the goblin’s puzzle.


Why I recommend it: The Goblin's Puzzle is a deliciously inventive tale, smart and a bit sassy, and brimming with humor and wordplay. You'll cheer for the Boy and for Plain Alice, and even find Mennofar, the Goblin, growing on you. This is the kind of book destined to become a modern classic, one that adults and children alike will enjoy. If you liked The Bartimaeus Trilogy or The Princess Bride, you'll love this.


Favorite Lines: "Though it pains me to taint the purity of such innocence, I feel obliged to point out that in this world, kindness, like the unicorn, is chiefly found in stories told to princesses," said Mennofar. "Ordinary folk look to how the coin falls." (from page 54)


Bonus: This is an excellent (and fun!) way to introduce young readers to the concept of deductive reasoning.


Here's a link to a lively interview with Andrew S. Chilton on Suzanne Warr's delightful blog, Tales From the Raven.  Her giveaway is now over, but mine is just beginning. That's right!

Through the generosity of the publisher, I'm thrilled to award one hardcover copy of The Goblin's Puzzle to one lucky winner. To enter you must be a follower of this blog and you must leave a comment on this post. If you mention this giveaway on social media, please include a link and I'll give you extra chances to win. This giveaway is open to U.S. mailing addresses only and will end at 10:00 pm EST on Sunday January 24, 2016. The winner will be announced on Monday January 25, 2016.




Monday, November 23, 2015

THE TRILOGY OF TWO by Juman Malouf for MMGM

First, some interesting news for fans of T.A. Barron's Young Merlin saga. They're making a movie! Woo hoo! And the script is being written by the co-writer of The Lord of the Rings movies, so there are high expectations for this film (and its possible sequels). That's excellent news for T.A. Barron fans.

Now on to today's MMGM. For other marvelous middle grade posts, see Shannon Messenger's blog.



The Trilogy of Two written and illustrated by Juman Malouf (Putnam's, November 10, 2015, for ages 10 and up, 416 pages)

Synopsis (from the publisher):  Twelve-year-old identical twins Sonja and Charlotte are musical prodigies with extraordinary powers. Born on All-Hallows-Eve, the girls could play music before they could walk. They were found one night by Tatty, the Tattooed Lady of the circus, in a pail on her doorstep with only a note and a heart-shaped locket. They’ve been with Tatty ever since, roaming the Outskirts in the circus caravans, moving from place to place.

But lately, curious things happen when they play their instruments. During one of their performances, the girls accidentally levitate their entire audience, drawing too much unwanted attention. Soon, ominous Enforcers come after them, and Charlotte and Sonja must embark on a perilous journey through enchanted lands in hopes of unlocking the secrets of their mysterious past.


Why I recommend it: Wow! This is a highly imaginative fantasy, with impressive world building by Malouf. It's set in a world that could be Earth in a far future (or an alternate past) when million-mile-high cities have overrun the planet. The author herself described it as a "post-apocalyptic, Dickensian world" in this article from The Daily Beast.

The twins are forced to travel to the Seven Edens, worlds they previously knew only as stories represented by the tattoos completely covering Tatty's skin. Luckily, they're accompanied by an intrepid band of new friends. So it's a classic journey story, a la Lord of the Rings or The Wizard of Oz, but with quite a few dark and startling twists. There is some violence, so I would not recommend this for younger middle grade readers. It's also quite lengthy, so give this to kids who love the longer Harry Potter books, or The Invention of Hugo Cabret.


Favorite line:  Charlotte ran through the gate and zigzagged among the broken-down railcars. She tried to remember pieces of music she used to play, but they all blended together in a tangle of notes. (from p. 71)


Bonus: Fantastically-detailed drawings by the author are the perfect accompaniment to this unusual story. Before she turned to writing and illustrating children's books, Juman Malouf was the set designer and costume designer for the film The Grand Budapest Hotel.



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Readers, please note: After today, I'm taking a blogging break to catch up on my reading and writing, and also get ready for the holidays. I wish you all the happiest of holidays, no matter which holiday(s) you celebrate. Here's a photo of my TBR pile, all spread out. Hoping to get to these (and possibly more) before January. Wish me luck!



Monday, November 16, 2015

SWITCH by Ingrid Law, a companion to SAVVY




Switch by Ingrid Law (September 2015, Dial Books for Young Readers, for ages 8 to 12)


Synopsis (from Indiebound): Gypsy Beaumont has always been a whirly-twirly free spirit, so as her thirteenth birthday approaches, she hopes to get a magical ability that will let her fly, or dance up to the stars. Instead, she wakes up on her birthday with blurry vision . . . and starts seeing flashes of the future and past. But when Momma and Poppa announce that her very un-magical, downright mean Grandma Pat has Alzheimer's and is going to move in with them, Gypsy's savvy along with her family's suddenly becomes its opposite. Now it's savvy mayhem as Gypsy starts freezing time, and no one could have predicted what would happen on their trip to bring Grandma Pat home . . . not even Gypsy.

Why I recommend it: Fantastic voice, loads of imagination, and a really cool savvy. I'm a huge fan of Ingrid Law's first book, SAVVY, which won a Newbery Honor and was also the Number One Book Sense (now Indiebound) Children's Pick for Summer 2008. See my thoughts here, in the American Bookseller Association's archives. Another favorite, SCUMBLE (2010), is a companion to SAVVY which explores Cousin Ledge's unusual talent and how he learns to control it. Now, with SWITCH, another companion novel, we see the Beaumont family from the POV of Gypsy, younger sister to Mibs. 

Bonus: Companion novels, instead of sequels, are a fun way to follow the same unusually-talented family but get to know different characters. Gypsy was only three in SAVVY, and now she's thirteen. It's like watching her grow up. 

Favorite line: "The snowflakes hung like poetry over the city." (p. 239, after Gypsy freezes time)

I especially loved what happened when Gypsy stopped time, and wish I could do the same thing! What savvy do you wish you had? 



Monday, November 9, 2015

A giveaway winner -- and for MMGM, a review of THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH

First, I have a winner to announce. The winner of 101 MOVIES TO SEE BEFORE YOU GROW UP by Suzette Valle is:

Susan Gregory

Congratulations, Susan! I'll get your book out to you pronto. 

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And now we return to our regular Monday broadcast, er, feature, MMGM.  See Shannon Messenger's blog for the links to other Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts.



The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin (Sept 22, 2015, Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, ages 10 and up)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting--things don't just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory--even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy's achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe...and the potential for love and hope right next door.

Why I recommend it: Beautiful writing and an expertly crafted plot. The simple, yet luminous language -- and Suzy's earnest desire -- makes this a joy to read, even though the subject matter is weighty with sadness. It's easy to see why The Thing About Jellyfish is a National Book Award Finalist (winners will be announced November 18) and has earned starred reviews from PW, Booklist, School Library Journal and others. 

Suzy's grief is heartbreakingly realistic. I lost a good friend at age 10 (she rode her bike across a busy street and never saw the truck that hit her), so this moving story affected me deeply. This book should also win at least a Newbery honor in January.

Favorite line: They are moving silently, endlessly, all of them, through the darkness of the sea (from pg. 109).

Bonus: You're bound to learn something about jellyfish!


Have you read The Thing About Jellyfish?  If not, what MG novels have you read that deal poignantly with grief?